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Posts Tagged ‘london’

Putting paid to notions that it takes years to write a book (damn! There goes my excuse) is the 24 Hour Book Project, a groundbreaking new initiative that’s challenging a bunch of writers, editors and publishers to take a book from pie-in-the-sky concept to published material in JUST ONE DAY.
The 24 Hour Book Project
The brainchild of the folks over at Completely Novel , the 24 Hour Book Project will kick off with a group of experienced writers putting their heads together via online collaborative writing tools. The squad includes Kate Pullinger (who’ll be heading up the project as the lead writer), Sarah Butler and Chris Meade, with the narrative being based around a group of city centre allotments, the exploration of communal spaces and the literal and symbolic walls built and smashed by individuals within a community.

Pens hit paper tomorrow (3rd October) from 10am, with volunteer editors and publishers taking the baton on Sunday to take the story to publication. And the best bit is that not only can you follow it all live online, but you can get involved – throw suggestions into the mix via Twitter (follow @24hrbook and use the hashtag #24hrbook); upload media including videos, music and images here; or help edit the book online from 10am BST on Sunday (email 24hrbook@completelynovel.com for the skinny on that.)

If that all sounds too much like hard work but your not averse to quaffing free champers, you might still be able to bag yourself a ticket for the book’s launch on Monday 5th October, 6pm, at Soho’s House of St Barnabas, where you’ll also be able to buy a copy of the book and see highlight’s of the weekend’s frantic authoring activity.

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The Murder One plaque: whodunnit?

The Murder One plaque: whodunnit?

 

murderone_frontjpg

One of Charing Cross’s past crime novel hubs finds itself embroiled in its very own mystery. Murder One, which saw its last spy thriller creep out of its doors back in January after 20 years of touting furtive thrills, and its Charing Cross companion Shipley, a specialist in art books that has also permanently shut up shop, have been gifted cultural landmark status by a clandestine crusader.

Past master: Shipley's blue plaque

Past master: Shipley's blue plaque

Shelved: The bowels of the Shipley

Shelved: The bowels of the Shipley

The plaques – which resemble the official blue plaques bestowed on sites of significant cultural heritage across a number of UK cities – that have appeared to mark the shell-like site of each shop were spotted by staff of other local bookshops as they rolled up to work last week. According to Time Out’s blog, a bookseller at Charing Cross art bookshop Keonig Books put the plaques puzzle down to “probably just some bullshit art students” (hmm… a faint whiff of culpability…?).

Shipley: Now you see it…

Shipley: Now you see it…

… now you don't

… now you don't

Well, be they presently whitewashed like lazy graffiti or allowed to remain as poignant, mysterious markers, the blue plaques are a fitting salute to this pair of lost literary luminaries.

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Bloomsbury's still a bookworm's haven

Bloomsbury's still a bookworm's haven

Nigh on a century since some of modern literature’s finest thinkers, writers and party throwers peopled its pretty gated squares, Bloomsbury’s still shaking its bookish tailfeather. And before my Virginia Woolf obsession triggers claims of bias, just check out the indie comic bookshop Gosh! Comics opposite the British Museum, of which one reviewer on Trustedplaces.com wrote:

“The staff are very knowledgeable and friendly and won’t have any truck with the sneering fanboy attitudes that can make comics shops a little unfriendly for anyone who hasn’t spent the last ten years reading about men in underpants.”

Add to Gosh! the socialist lit hub Bookmarks and the London Review Bookshop and you have yourself a jolly old afternoon of browsing, picking brains and emptying your pockets of spare change. Brilliant.

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Congratulations and the bumps to The Big Green Bookshop in London’s Wood Green, which turns one this week. The indie book seller opened its doors in the wake of the local Waterstones shutting up shop because, apparently, “people in Wood Green don’t read.”

This video of the Big Green volunteers (uploaded by the Big Green gents to YouTube) whipping the place into shape makes the prospect of swapping your desk chair for a library ladder more appealing than ever…

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